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The Marketing Mentor Podcast

In the Marketing Mentor podcast, Ilise Benun, founder of Marketing-Mentor.com, offers short but meaty conversational interviews with creative professionals who are doing what it takes to stop feast or famine, get better clients and command the fees they deserve – and sharing what they’ve learned.
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Now displaying: August, 2011

Ilise Benun, founder of Marketing-Mentor.com and author of 7 books, including The Creative Professional’s Guide to Money, interviews her clients and other successful creative professionals about what’s working when it comes to the latest marketing tools and pricing strategies. Ilise’s conversational style is friendly and engaging as she presses her interviewees to reveal the details that you don’t hear anywhere else about what exactly they are doing and how it is working. Each episode is a no-fluff chat about the nuts and bolts of how designers, copywriters, photographers and other creatives are doing to grow their business to get better clients with bigger budgets. Topics covered include taking control over your business, ending the feast or famine syndrome, finding your niche, identifying the ideal clients who value your services and can pay what you’re worth, developing your own marketing style and cultivating relationships that will last.

For more, sign up for her Quick Tips at marketing-mentortips.com

Aug 13, 2011

I grabbed a few minutes with PhotoShelter's Vice President of Marketing, Andrew Fingerman, to talk about a particularly sticky issue - when and how to directly ask your clients about their budget while pitching for new business.

Here's an excerpt: 

Are we a good fit?

The primary reason to bring up the budget issue is to identify early on if the pitch is even worth making. Many photographers waste a lot of time talking to prospects who can't afford them. You'll find out sooner or later if the client can afford your services, so being straightforward and talking budget can help save both parties some time. But how early is too early? Ilise suggests if you suspect the prospect likely can't afford you, broach the budget question sooner. If you think they likely can afford you, it is ok to wait until later on in your pitch.  

Recognize the conversation itself won't be a dealbreaker

Avoid building up assumptions in your head that can make having the conversation more uncomfortable than it needs to be. Often, photographers will be afraid to start talking money because it may lead to losing the project. Talking about money isn't going to prevent you from getting the job - the client not being able to afford to pay you fairly will. (But, we're assuming that's a job you don't want anyway.) 

See the entire blog post here: http://blog.photoshelter.com/2011/08/talking-budget-with-your-clients.html

And listen to the interview here. 

Aug 8, 2011

It’s 3 months into Bryn Mooth’s career as a freelance food writer, and I’ve been interviewing her along the way. (See our previous interviews: Asking Questions = Looking Stupid and The First Week as a Freelancer.)

In today’s interview, we talked about the importance of tuning into what’s around you. Bryn says, 

“Once you start thinking about something that’s next, or something that’s possible, then you tune in somehow to those opportunities you would have missed otherwise.”

We also discuss some issues related to the “lazy” days of summer and the mindset of self-employment, such as:

- Is it okay to have an “off” day and cut yourself some slack?

- The right approach to a non-productive day…

- Is the glow still going, or has it faded?

- Do you start believing the things you tell yourself when you’re in the non-productive mood? Does that spiral into non-productivity?

- How to deal with not knowing where the next project will come from…

- Learning to be patient…

- How to interpret really enthusiastic prospects

- And more…

If you have a case of the summertime “I don’t wannas,” get back on track by listening to this interview.

Listen here.

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